Lively brush lettering

Adults 

Teenagers 

30 min

What you need:

For this exercise we recommend the following selection of Faber-Castell products: Pitt Artist Pen in black or any of the 48 colors. Different nips sizes and forms allow special effects and unique results. Enjoy!

In a world full of digitized letters and standard typefaces, the organic art of hand lettering offers a fresh, artistic, and spirited approach to beautiful writing.

The first important technical elements for a beginner of hand lettering to learn are hold, stroke, and rhythm. You must learn to do these things correctly before you will be able to write consistent letters. It takes practice in order to work with confidence.

Exercises for beginners

This alphabet can go in several different directions, depending on attitude. It can be viney and au natural, it can be busy and quirky, or the lines can be smooth or broken. The letterforms are on the narrow side to allow for the curlicues that encroach on their neighboring letters.

Exercises for advanced

This  doodlelike alphabet with sophisticated play, is characterized by lots of movement and personality. As in any other alphabet, one must grasp the idea of dynamic balance (the amount of black versus white that each letter contains) with a touch of uncomfortable variation. The lines dance around the narrow, squarelike structure that makes up each majuscule. This alphabet serves as a good way to both practice and play at the same time.

More ideas

Matching Themes and Letters
Just imagine sea salt in the air and sand between your toes...
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Tangly letters
A few simple patterns can create endless pieces of art.
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Unique frames and borders
You don’t need much formal preparation to begin doodling!
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Decorative embellishments
It’s time to take your lettering to the next level!
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Excerpt from "Lettering & Word Design", published by Walter Foster Publishing, a division of Quarto Publishing Group USA Inc. All rights reserved. Walter Foster is a registered trademark. Artwork © John Stevens. Visit www.quartoknows.com